The Testimonies that Led to Trump’s Impeachment

A look inside the congressional impeachment testimonies.

Maria Yovanovitch testifying before U.S. Congress. Photo courtesy of Business Insider.

Maria Yovanovitch testifying before U.S. Congress. Photo courtesy of Business Insider.

Sydney MacNaughton, Writer

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In the last three weeks, the world has seen testimony from top diplomat to Ukraine William Taylor, Deputy Assistant Secretary of State for European and Eurasian affairs George Kent, and former Ukraine ambassador and US Ambassador to the European Union Maria Yovanovitch. All three have provided personal accounts in the case of impeachment against President Donald Trump. 

Taylor was the first to give testimony. He spoke about a member of his staff who was at a restaurant in Kiev along with Ambassador Sondland when Trump called Sondland on the phone on Jul. 25. The member of Taylor’s staff, along with everyone else at the table, was able to hear the conversation between Sondland and Trump despite the call not being on speaker, Taylor said. Trump’s purpose of the call was to ask Sondland about the investigation of 2020 hopeful presidential candidate Joe Biden, demonstrating Trump’s active involvement with the investigation, Taylor added. 

On the same day, George Kent described the realization that Trump’s personal attorney, Rudy Giuliani, and his search for information about Joe Biden was quickly deteriorating U.S. relations with Ukraine. 

Later on Nov. 15, Marie Yovanovitch testified to Congress. During this testimony Trump tweeted about her and said she was to blame for many of the problems in the countries she worked. 

Chairman Adam Schiff asked Yovanovitch during the hearing about how the president’s tweeting may affect future testifiers, to which she replied, “It’s very intimidating.”

Yovanovitch also said Giuliani cased her termination as ambassador in order for Giuliani to communicate more freely and feloniously with Ukraine. 

Sondland, considered an important testimony, testified on Nov. 20. Within the first few minutes of the hearing, Sondland said Trump did request a quid pro quo with Ukrainian President Zelensky. He admitted to reluctantly working with Giuliani in pressuring Ukraine into starting a politically motivated investigation of Biden under Trump’s orders. 

Following the holiday recess, the Senate intends to hear the testimonies of Director of the Office of Management and Budget Mick Mulvaney, Secretary of State Mike Pompeo, and Vice President Mike Pence in the trial following Trump’s impeachment.