Humans of Laker Nation: Emily Nance

Emily+Nance+working+to+finish+an+assignment+before+class+is+over.

Emily Nance working to finish an assignment before class is over.

Brooklynn Rosenberg

Q: What teacher in the school has influenced you the most positive and why?

A: “This year I met Ms. Marshall, my photography teacher. She has a really positive impact on others all the time and is always just so happy. I think she really opens up people’s creative sides, which is something I didn’t even know I had.”

 

Q: What is your favorite memory of West Bloomfield High School so far?

A: “Probably homecoming, the first homecoming was mediocre, but this homecoming was really fun and special. After covid, I was with some of my closest friends and not just a random group so it was really fun after covid.”

 

Q: What was your first day of ninth grade like?

A: “I remember sitting in the car with my mom, and not really wanting to get out, and I remember just staring down the front of the school before walking in and being absolutely terrified. I just remember being so scared and walking right in. I remember what I was wearing, I didn’t really have a sense of myself back then so I just wore what everyone else wore, and I wish I didn’t. But overall I just remember by the end of the day loving it, I remember having a lot more freedom and I really liked that.”

 

Q: What have you found the hardest in high school so far and why?

A: “I think managing friendships in school can be hard a lot of the time. With the freedom we do have it also comes with a cost. We have a lot of freedom, but what we do with that time is mostly a lot of homework and work, so managing those friendships outside of school is definitely a challenge because it involves a lot of time management. But I learned that if they’re your real friends then they’ll stick by you no matter what.”

 

Q: What year of high school has been your favorite so far and why?

A: “Junior year, I think we’ve had a lot more freedom and I think I sat with myself for a long time during sophomore year and covid, and really found who I was as a person. I also think I’ve been living a much happier life since then after doing so much reflecting on myself.”

 

Q: What year of high school has been your least favorite so far and why?

A: “Freshman year, I feel like looking back at the memories as a junior I’m like wow, the little things I used to be so upset about, and I look at it now and I’m like that didn’t even matter, like holy crap why did I care.”

Emily Nance talking with her friend Ellie about school and friend problems.

Q: Do you think you will be happy or sad to graduate and why?

A: “I think it’s a bittersweet thing, I’m gonna watch some of my friends go off and do some really great things. I’m also gonna watch them move away and I’m gonna be separated from them and I won’t see them every day, that is something I’m definitely gonna have to get used to. But also I think that by the time senior year comes around, I’m gonna be so tired of this school to the point where I want out. I’m gonna miss my friends of course, but there are new things waiting for everyone, and I believe that if they are my real friends like I said, they’re gonna stick around.”

Ellie helping Emily work on her homework assignment.

Q: What career path do you want to go into? What do you think has influenced this?

A: “During covid, I had a lot of design freedom in my own house. We were redoing our house and because of covid since you have a lack of access to people to redesign the house, I stepped in. I think I found a real passion for designing, with designing a couple of rooms in the house. So I think interior design and architecture is definitely the career path I want to go down.”

 

Q: If you had a chance to move from West Bloomfield to a different school district would 

you? Why? 

A: “No, I already moved from Walled Lake to West Bloomfield in middle school and it was such a big change for me. I also feel like the people here are a lot more real and I think I have so many great friendships that I wouldn’t ever wanna risk losing by moving schools.”