Pat’s Facts!

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St. Patrick’s Day is an Irish holiday traditionally celebrated on March 17th, the death day of Saint Patrick. Saint Patrick was Ireland’s patron saint and is credited for bringing Christianity to the country. Not only is this holiday celebrated in Ireland, it is celebrated around the world.stpatricksday

  • St. Patrick, who is celebrated on St. Patrick’s Day, is not actually Irish. He was born to Roman parents in Scotland or Wales in the late fourteenth century.
  • St. Patrick’s color is actually a light blue, not green. Green was only associated with St. Patrick’s Day after the Irish independence movement in late 18th century.
  • Until 1970, there were no pubs or bars open on St. Patrick’s Day because it was considered a religious holiday. However, it was then converted into a national holiday, and beer is now widely available for consumption on the holiday.
  • In 2012, it was estimated that people around the world spent about $245 million on beer on St. Patrick’s day.
  • Shamrocks are associated with St. Patrick’s Day because according to Irish legend, St. Patrick used the plant as a metaphor for the Holy Trinity when he was first introducing Christianity to Ireland.
  • According to Irish legend, St. Patrick was responsible for driving all of the snakes outside of Ireland. However according to modern scientists, there were never really any reptiles living in Ireland because of the bitterly cold weather. The snakes are actually metaphors for the pagans that St. Patrick converted to Christianity.
  • The Chicago River is dyed green in honor of St. Patrick’s Daychicagoriver
  • There are no female leprechauns in traditional Irish folktales, only male.
  • During St. Patrick’s Day, people say “Erin go Bragh” as a celebratory yell, which means “Ireland Forever”
  • According to the Guinness Book of World Records, the record for leaves on a clover is fourteen leaves.
  • St. Patrick’s Day should never be called “St. Patty’s Day”. It can be called St. Patrick’s Day, St. Paddy’s Day, or Paddy’s Day.
  • March 17th is when St. Patrick died.
  • At 16, St. Patrick was kidnapped by Irish raiders
  • The chances of finding a four leaf clover is 1 in 10,000. Good Luck!
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